FRINGE REVIEW: TORTE E MORTE: SONGS OF CAKE AND DEATH

A witty and cleverly structured show with a unique and interesting concept, Torte e Morte: Songs of Cake and Death is one to catch this Adelaide Fringe Festival.

Anya Anastasia plays Marie Antoinette, and we meet her at the commencement of the Anya Anastasia's TORTE E MORT Songs of Cake and Death_IMG1_LR (1)party to end all parties – for her at least; we meet Her Royal Highness at her death.

Accompanied by the incredibly talented Bec Matthews on percussion, Anya sings intelligently hilarious songs about Marie Antoinette, her reign, and her sad demise.

Some excellent staging is used to enhance the production, including a guillotine blade being played with a bow, and some hilarious props when Marie loses her head – but we won’t spoil it for you.

The 18th Century costumes are spot on, and play a role in the comic aspect of the show, particularly in Anya’s song about not doing burlesque; and the use of body paint is very effective.

Anya’s voice is very Miller-Heidke-esque; she has a fabulous range, and her skills as an accomplished musician are very well used in both the songs and the comedy.

The three-person show was created by Anya and produced with the help of two iconic mainstays of the Melbourne cultural scene: Helpmann and multi-Green Room award-winning performer Sarah Ward, and devisor of circus and physical theatre, Sue Broadway – so there are many terrifically funny moments, some wonderful songs, and the team have developed a quality show around a fascinating concept.

Torte e Morte: Songs of Cake and Death is only on for a limited season at Ukiyo at Royal Croquet Club so catch it while you can – it stands out from the rest.

4 stars

Reviewed by Libby Parker

***

libby-parker
Libby Parker is a journalist, teacher and life enthusiast.
You can follow her on Twitter at @upsidenews_lib