EXPRESSIONS HEADLINERS LIST WOMADELAIDE HIGHLIGHTS

This weekend, WOMADelaide will bring another huge lineup of music, dance, arts, talks, market stalls and food to sample. 

Expressions Media’s young journalists from Headliners at WOMADelaide have put together their top tips for this year’s festival for you.

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Expressions Media’s Headliners at WOMADelaide workshop participants with journalist Libby Parker

Music – Shae Bogdanovic

The music at WOMADelaide is a chance to experience and learn about a myriad of different cultures, find out about or support local artists and listen to music that you may never have heard before.

It is also an opportunity for people who weren’t born in Australia, but live here now, to come and support musicians of their own ethnicity, feel closer to home and share their own culture with the people around them.

I have been to WOMADelaide almost every year and it has become a huge part of my life and something I look forward to; every year I learn something about the artists, the music and where it comes from.

The musicians at WOMAD don’t just perform their music, they share a huge part of their lives with you and talk a lot about their music and where it comes from.

Many of the performances I have seen at WOMAD felt so personalised and by the end of the show you would often feel like you knew the musicians, rather than just coming to listen to their music. 

If you are interested in listening to music at WOMADelaide I would recommend you see; The Cat Empire, Stellie, Odette, Tulletar and Echo Drama. 

Dance – Megan Adrain

As the Botanic Park comes to life with the festival of WOMAD dance takes its place on the line-up.

B.Dance, a company from Taiwan, are flying down to share their story called Floating Flower, through physical movement.

The newly formed company, founded in 2014, takes the audience to the traditional Taiwanese Buddhist ceremonies known as the Ghost Festival.

The performance that they are sharing with the WOMAD crowd incorporates contemporary dance with traditional Asian movements and martial arts.  

 

Food – Mounisha Nidadavolu

WOMAD is a whirlwind of music, dance and ideas, and is also a great place to explore various other countries and cultures through food. 

You can tease your taste buds with something at each food stall or even the restaurant.

You can go through each of the food stalls and take a bite of something that is special to that country or culture and discover something new that you might be addicted to, the moment you sink your teeth into it. 

It also features a restaurant that serves a full, six-dish feast at the Taste the World Restaurant, a ride through heaven for food lovers. There are also multiple bars to have a beer or fancy wine to spice up your evening. 

You should check out Ali’s Biryani and Tikka House, as Biryani is a guilty pleasure of mine – just absolutely delicious!

Stalls – Vasita Gavara-Nanu

At the WOMAD festival, unique, hand made designer products are showcased at the markets for a great price.

The products range from beautiful handbags created out of timber and fine material, amazing ceramics, earrings and much, much more.

WOMAD gives you a chance try out different styles and types of fashion while enjoying tasty cuisine and unforgettable performances.

When taking a stroll, why not check out Shangal Lil And the Scarlet Fez, which sells all-natural, vegan soaps, perfumes, lip balm and more. Or, if you’re more into fashion, check out Kalila, where you can find a range of t-shirts, skirts and dresses in different styles.

There are so many different markets stall at WOMAD so while you’re in the festival, don’t forget check them out!

Talks – Abuoio Wiew

From Friday to Monday at WOMAD, there are some great talks going on about all kinds of things.

Greg Roach, Jill Dorrian, Danny Eckert and the host Deb Tribe will be talking about waking up tired (we all have that struggle getting up in the morning but still feel like you need more sleep). Why is that, you ask? How much sleep do you really need? Find out from some great, internationally respected sleep researchers to find out how to improve your way of sleeping. 

If you end up falling asleep through that talk, don’t worry there are plenty more to choose from, like about how much more we need to do to take care of our planet with Bernie Hobbs as your host. Or some girl power at 1pm on Sunday for International Women’s Day with Jan Fran speaking and Tory Shepherd as your host. There are many great talks to choose from. 

Workshops – Alvy Robinson

Each year, WOMADelaide offers an Artists in Conversation (AIC) and Workshops series, which is an interesting insight into the lives and careers of the artists on the line up, and a great way to learn new things. 

You can start each day of the festival with a yoga session, take a workshop with King Ayisoba about his kologo, a traditional instrument from Ghana’s Upper East Region, try out different vocal techniques, learn some Finnish lyrics and sing with Tuuletar or join Ustad Saami for an Artist in Conversation. See the full line up here.

Art installations and Theatre – Bert Rich

The UK’s As the World Tipped will present a fascinating commentary on many hot social issues through an aerial performance backed by grand projections. 

The French Le Caramantran bring us an interactive piece fit with brilliant four metre high puppets that can barely be written of. You must see it to fully grasp the piece and see their vision of beauty and poetry in all that is around us.

Craig Walsh has come with his Monuments masterpiece; in which he projects his work against the most unlikely of places and structures, his haunting installations highlight certain individuals whose work has been crucial to the development of environmentalist causes.

While the music is, and is rightfully so, what draws the majority of people to festival yearly, the rest is not to be ignored. Visual artists from around the globe flock to the festival to showcase their own passions. 

Check out the full line up HERE.

By Megan Adrain, Bert Rich, Abuoio Wiew, Mounisha Sai Nidadavolu, Vasita Gavara-Nanu, Alvy Robinson, Shaela Bogdanovic