The ninety minute film documents the recording of Aretha Franklin’s 1972 gospel album of the same name.

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This is a story of redemption, and the value one attributes to family. The reality is that Rose-Lynn is largely unlikable during the piece. Perhaps the mark of a talented actress in Buckley, we get frustrated by her behaviours, and ultimately don’t necessarily want her to succeed in her quest for country music stardom. That being said, it is worth persevering with Wild Rose, because the last fifteen minutes fills you with a sense of satisfaction.

There are a number of gags that challenge the stereotypes around young black women, and Little is largely a film of female empowerment, supported by an all-black female lead cast. The fact that, at 13, Martin herself is the driving force behind the film is pretty exceptional to say the least.